essays and reviews

Los Angeles Review of Books

Because London is Still a Kaleidoscope: review of Mark Ford’s anthology, London: A History in Verse

Horizon Review

By the Light of the Silvery Moon: Dowson, Schoenberg and the Birth of Modernism (pdf)
To Hull and Braque: a review of Ian Duhig’s Pandorama (pdf)

Verse Palace

The Line, by Katy Evans-Bush (pdf)
N.b., a much longer version of this essay is published in the critical anthology Stress Fractures, edited by Tom Chivers and published by Penned in the Margins

Contemporary Poetry Review

The Tawdry Halo of the Idle Martyr: MacNeice’s Autumn Journal
The Poet Realized: in conversation with Ruth Fainlight
There’s no Place Like Home: Gethsemane Day, by Dorothy Molloy
Classic Readings: a take on Joseph Brodsky

The Poem UK

Dorothy Molloy ‘Hare Soup’ reviewed by Katy Evans-Bush (pdf)

Poetry International Web profiles

Fleur Adcock
Patience Agbabi
Roy Fisher
WN Herbert
Helen Ivory
David Morley
Alice Oswald
Shazea Quraishi
Michael Symmons Roberts
Warsan Shire
Dorothea Smartt
Jon Stone
Karen McCarthy Woolf

Normblog

Writer’s Choice: On Divine Comedies, by James Merrill

A note about Horizon Review

In July 2010 I took over as editor of Salt Publishing’s online magazine Horizon Review, set up in homage to Cyril Connolly’s great ‘little magazine’ of the forties, Horizon.

My involvement with the magazine had begun with its first issue: of the four issues before I took over, I had work in every one.

I kept up the editorial policy Jane Holland had established, of publishing work that was interesting, engaged, perhaps a little offbeat. Unlike the dark days when Connolly started his magazine, we now have a plethora of journals, reviews and zines, both paper and digital, but none of them is quite like Horizon Review. Rather than aiming for ‘excellence’ (however you define it), I aimed for a refreshing, eclectic mix, and championed openness, integrity, and a sort of free range of the culture, including reviews of film, TV, and anything else of interest.

Unfortunately, Horizon Review folded in 2011. Although I had hoped it could be retained,  in a reorganisation of Salt Publishing’s website in 2012 the archive was deleted.